SARS-CoV-2 and UVC

According to the latest knowledge, SARS-CoV-2 can remain contagious for up to 3 hours in the air, up to 4 hours on copper surfaces, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to 2-3 days on stainless steel and plastic.

All coronaviruses have a similar structure and single-stranded RNA length (approximately 30 kb), which allows us to conclude that they also have very similar UVC absorption properties and susceptibility to UVC disinfection.

On low absorption vehicles, the most accurate estimate of the D90 deactivating dose for the coronavirus group is 37 J/m² (median). This dose, with a virus density comparable to that observed in SARS-CoV-2 infection, was sufficient to reduce by three log orders, and complete inhibition of all viral concentrations was observed at 169 J/m². Interestingly, the average deactivating effective dose of D90 for SARS-CoV-2 virus for studies conducted in 2020 is only 27 J/m² (Bianco, Inagaki).

Since the coronaviruses do not differ significantly in terms of structure, the SARS-CoV-2 virus – as well as possible future mutations of it – will most likely also be very sensitive to UV radiation, so that current UVC disinfection procedures and doses will remain effective for a long time.

Sources:

“A Genomic Model for Predicting the Ultraviolet Susceptibility of Viruses” Wladyslaw J. Kowalski, William P. Bahnfleth, Mark T. Hernandez

“Ultraviolet purification application information” Philips Lighting B.V. UV Health and Wellness

“CIE POSITION STATEMENT ON THE USE OF ULTRAVIOLET (UV) RADIATION TO MANAGE THE RISK OF COVID-19 TRANSMISSION” z dnia 12 maja 2020r.

“Ultraviolet irradiation doses for coronavirus inactivation – review and analysis of coronavirus photoinactivation studies” Martin Heßling, Katharina Hönes, Petra Vatter, Christian Lingenfelder, GMS ( German Medical Scince ) Hyg Infect Control , 14.05.2020r.

“UV-C irradiation is highly effective in inactivating and inhibiting SARS-CoV-2 replication” (05.06.2020r) by Andrea Bianco (1,§), Mara Biasin (2,§) Giovanni Pareschi (1), Adalberto Cavalieri (3), Claudia Cavatorta (3), Claudio Phoetia (2), Paola Galli (1), Luigi Lessio (4), Manuela Lualdi (5), Edoardo Redaelli (1), Irma Saulle (2,6), Daria Trabattoni (2), Alexios Zanutta (1), Mario Clerici (6,7,*). 1) Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) – Brera Astronomical Observatory, Merate, Italy. 2) Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences L. Sacco, University of Milano, Milano, Italy. 3) Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, IRCCS Foundation, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. 4) Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) – Padova Astronomical Observatory, Padova, Italy. 5) Department of Imaging Diagnostic and Radioterapy, IRCCS Foundation, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.6) Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milano, Milano, Italy. 7) Don C. Gnocchi Foundation, IRCCS Foundation, Milano, Italy.

Corrigendum to “UV-LED disinfection of Coronavirus: wavelength effect” [Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology 212 (2020) 112044-end page]. Gerchman Y, Mamane H, Friedman N, Mandelboim M.